Heavy Metals

Toxic Elements

Toxic elements, also known as heavy metals, are understood to be common in our modern daily lives, from inside our homes to our occupations.

We understand heavy metal exposure may affect daily health, mood, well-being and be associated with symptoms across many different systems in the human body.

 

Copper
Blocks

Cadmium blocks

Mercury blocks

Arsenic blocks

Lead blocks

Aluminium blocks

Antimony blocks

Sodium

bad

Potassium

bad

Magnesium

bad

bad

Calcium

bad

Iron

bad

bad

bad

Zinc

bad

bad

bad

bad

bad

Chromium

bad

Selenium

bad

bad

bad

bad

bad

Molybdenum

bad

bad

Manganese

bad

Phosphorus

bad

Vitamin B1

bad

bad

Vitamin C

bad

bad

Vitamin E

bad

bad

bad

Folate

bad

heavy-metals-1

More About Heavy Metals

Sources of heavy metals may include:

  • Copper: Food, water, particularly in Perth with many copper water pipes, supplements (over 100ug)
  • Cadmium: Cigarettes, food (Cadmium is a contaminant of normal superphosphate fertilizers, so all commercial foods not grown organically would be expected to contain cadmium), household items, toys.
  • Lead: Water, makeup, household items, petrol and car fumes, paints.
  • Mercury: Fish, fillings, vaccines.
  • Aluminium: Antiperspirant deodorants, cookware, aluminium foil, bleaches flour, regional water supplies, antacid medications.
  • Arsenic: Water, playgrounds, termite treatments.
  • Beryllium: Light switches, fillings, copper pipes.
  • Antimony: Make up, fabrics, printing ink, paints.

Occupations with exposure to heavy metals may include:

  • Copper: Plumbers, electricians, petroleum industry works, fertiliser/pesticide exposure industries.
  • Cadmium: Mechanics, tyre fitters, welders, plumbers, carpet layers, jewelers, toy industry, plastics industry, non-organic food industry workers.
  • Mercury: Dental technicians, dentists, dental nurses, petroleum industry workers, gold miners, medical technologists, sugar cane workers.
  • Arsenic: Gold miners, metallurgists, landscape workers, carpenters, builders, brickies, bore drillers, concrete workers.
  • Lead: Mechanics, plumbers, welders, petroleum industry workers, painters, renovators, lead lighting industry workers, fishermen.
  • Aluminium: Plumbers, ducting installers, aircraft workers, welders, miners, refinery workers.

How heavy metals may be associated with health:

Heavy metals are sometimes called ‘anti-nutrients’ as each toxic element ‘blocks’ (via intracellular antagonism) one or more nutrients that are important for our health.

This can mean that even though we have enough magnesium in the body, and our blood tests are showing adequate magnesium levels, the person may be experiencing severe symptoms of magnesium deficiency, as Lead is “blocking” the action of magnesium.

So not only does the toxic element have harmful health effects, it can also disrupt many other systems and pathways in the body causing widespread symptoms difficult to explain.

Health concerns which may be related to heavy metals include:

  • Copper: may lead to fatigue, anxiety, depression, phobias, is commonly associated with excess oestrogen levels, low Vitamin C and Vitamin B3.
  • Lead: may lead to hyperactivity and aggression.
  • Aluminium: may lead to fatigue, memory loss and senility.
  • Cadmium: may lead to aggression and confusion.
  • Mercury: may lead to headaches, fatigue and memory loss.

Heavy metals may affect nutrients:

  • Lead: may block iron, calcium, molybdenum, manganese, chromium, sulphur, cobalt.
  • Mercury: may block zinc, selenium, iron, sulphur, cobalt, transmembrane ion channels.
  • Cadmium: may block zinc, magnesium, selenium, sulphur.
  • Arsenic: may block vitamin E, selenium, sulphur, boron.
  • Aluminium: may block vitamin E, vitamin C, vitamin B1, zinc, selenium, sodium, potassium, phosphorus.
  • Antimony: may block zinc, selenium.

Heavy metals at 'low' levels

It is understood even low levels of heavy metal exposure may affect different areas of health and daily well-being.

The definition of a ‘toxic level’ of a substance may not be defined by medicine or what is safe for long-term human health and well-being.  On top of this, over the past 100 years, the ‘toxic level’ of certain heavy metals has been raised, to match the increasing levels in our environment and bodies.

Read on for more information about testing and correcting heavy metals.

Contact us today for more information

Let us guide you to a happier, healthier you.